Where eagles land

Near winter gathering spots, towns capitalize on the birds' popularity by throwing festivals.

On the Mississippi, an eagle trolls for fish in the waters below the dam in Genoa, Wis.

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Eagles don't really have lovable personalities. But, man, are they fun to watch.

Those haughty pale eyes, that 6-foot wing span, those wicked talons and the flesh-shredding beak eagles are just plain cool.

Everything about them is larger than life, right down to their nests, which are so big and sturdy that bears sometimes climb into them to hibernate.

To watch an eagle wheeling and dipping through the air is treat enough. It's even more of a thrill to see an airborne food fight or the tandem plummet of mating eagles.

As eagle populations have increased, it's no longer uncommon to spot a bald eagle. But that's only increased the number of tourists who want to do so.

In winter, the birds gather along the Mississippi, Wisconsin and Illinois rivers, wherever there's open water. Viewing is good there, so many towns sponsor annual eagle-watching weekends.

Here's a calendar of events. In 2021, check before you go for cancellations or changes.

For tips on finding the birds yourself, see Looking for bald eagles.

For more about winter eagle-watching, see Open sesame on the sloughs.

For more Wabasha and Reads Landing, Minn., where many wintering eagles congregate, and the National Eagle Center in Wabasha, which has five resident eagles, see All eyes on Wabasha.

Trip Tips: Eagle-watching festivals and tours in the Upper Midwest

January and February, Eagle-watching bus tours in Sauk City/Prairie du Sac, Wis. Ferry Bluff Eagle Council volunteers guide these hourlong tours at 10 a.m. Saturdays, $5 (free during Eagle Days). Reserve as early as possible.

January, Bald Eagle Watch in Clinton, Iowa. It features live-eagle and nature programs at Clinton Community College and free bus service to Lock & Dam 13 in Fulton, Ill.

It's canceled in 2021, but a naturalist may be at the lock and dam with a spotting scope.

Jan. 9, 2021, In Search of Eagles in northeast Illinois. At three dams along the Fox River in McHenry County, naturalists and park rangers will help visitors search for eagles with scopes and binoculars. There will also be activities for children.

January, Bald Eagle Days in Rock Island, Ill. At the Quad Cities Conservation Alliance Expo Center, there's an environmental fair, with flying demonstrations by eagles, hawks and owls and many other events. Admission. 

Jan. 16, 2021, Bald Eagle Watching Days in Prairie du Sac, Wis. This year, the festival is virtual, with some live programs and some prerecorded. 

January, Bald Eagle Watch in Dubuque, Iowa.  Live-eagle programs and free trolley rides from the Grand River Center downtown to the National Mississippi River Museum and Lock & Dam 11.

January and February, Bald Eagle Bus Tours from Galena, Ill. The four-hour tours to viewing spots along the Mississippi are hosted by the Eagle Nature Foundation.

Jan. 16-17, 2021, Bald Eagle Appreciation Days in Keokuk, Iowa. There's live-eagle presentations, Native American activities, demonstrations and viewing on the river. This year, all indoor activities will be virtual.

January, Eagle-Watch/Clock Tower Tours of the Mississippi River Visitors Center in Rock Island, Ill. The center is on Lock & Dam 15. To reserve one of the free tours, 10 to 11:30 a.m. or noon to 1:30 p.m., call 309-794-5338.

Jan. 23, 2021, Bald Eagle Watching Days in Prairie du Sac, Wis. This year, the festival is virtual, with some live programs and some prerecorded. 

January, Eagle Watch Weekend around Utica, Ill. The Illinois Audubon Society sponsors activities at Starved Rock Lodge, the Starved Rock State Park visitors center and, across the river, the Illinois Waterway Visitor Center. 

It's canceled in 2021. For more about the area, see Marvels of Starved Rock.

Feb. 6, 2021, Bald Eagle Watching Days in Prairie du Sac, Wis. This year, the festival is virtual, with some live programs and some prerecorded. 

February, Eagle Viewing Field Trip from Wabasha, Minn. The National Eagle Center hosts a four-hour motorcoach tour to viewing locations, $40.

February, Eagle-Watch/Clock Tower Tours of the Mississippi River Visitors Center in Rock Island, Ill. The center is on Lock & Dam 15. To reserve one of the free tours, 10 to 11:30 a.m. or noon to 1:30 p.m., call 309-794-5338.

The tours visit five eagle communities between Dubuque and Green Island, just south of Bellevue and typically see between 30 and 350 eagles.

Feb. 20, 2021, Bald Eagle Watching Days in Prairie du Sac, Wis. This year, the festival is virtual, with some live programs and some prerecorded. 

February, Bald Eagle Appreciation Day in Prairie du Chien, Wis., and Effigy Mounds National Monument near Marquette, Iowa. Birding experts give programs and lead mini field trips, depending on weather. 

March 6, 2021, Bald Eagle Watching Day in Ferryville, Wis. There are live-eagle programs at the community center and watching from River Park Observation Deck on the Mississippi in this town between La Crosse and Prairie du Chien.

Weekends in March, Soar With the Eagles festival in Wabasha, Minn. The National Eagle Center hosts special events, programs and speakers every weekend in March during spring migrations.

The center, which has five resident eagles, is open year-round, with special programs at 11 a.m. and 1 and 3 p.m. Admission is $10, $7 for children 4-17. 

June-August, Raptor Tours at the Raptor Education Group in Antigo, Wis. In summer, this rehabilitation center in northeast Wisconsin offers hourlong outdoors tours on Tuesdays, Thursdays and some Mondays and Saturdays. 

Cost is $12, $8 for children 12 and under. Reserve in advance.



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